The Meaning Behind the Revelation Series and the End of the Universe

A number of people have asked me to explain how the idea for the Revelation of Brian A. Pearlmitter series came to be.   Especially before book three came out, they also wanted to know what the rest of the Revelation was going to be.  I’ll explain a bit here, hopefully without giving away too much.boxedsetfin

Describing the series is hard.  It’s part science fiction, part soap opera, part end-of-the-world story, and part mystery.  I guarantee it will be like nothing you’ve ever read.

The inspiration for the story came from recent scientific discoveries. Science is, at its most basic, an attempt to understand the workings of the universe. On the micro level, scientists have done a lot but there’s a lot left to do. There is so much to be discovered that it seems impossible for them to ever really explain more than a tiny fraction of the workings of our universe. But they busily continue to try, as armies of scientists work on everything from the cause of cancer, to new types of rockets that will be needed if man is to fly in deep space. This type of scientific quest is what I call the Micro Level. In the big scheme of things, this is the small stuff.

But did you know that, on the Macro Level, science has already learned all there is to know about our universe? The Macro Level deals with the entire universe, how it started and how it will end. This is BIG, BIG picture.   And on this scale, science has discovered it all.

Everything.

We can even know the date when it became official that science had discovered the entirety of the BIG picture.

It was October 4, 2011.

On that date, the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to three scientists: Brian P. Schmidt, Adam G. Riess, and Saul Perlmutter. They won the award by making the discovery that explains everything.

Their discovery was that the universe was still expanding.  And most disturbingly (to me, at least) that it was expanding at an increasing rate.

“So what?” you might say.  That’s a good question.

Imagine you throw a ball in the air.  The instant it leaves your hand, what happens?

It starts to slow down, of course.  Gravity exerts a force that pulls it back to earth.  Thus, it continually slows until it momentarily stops in mid air.  Then it begins its fall.

Ever since the Big Bang was first hypothesized, that’s what science thought would happen to the universe after the initial explosion.  They thought it would explode outwards until it started to slow, and then it would eventually start to contract.  This would result in the collapse of everything until a new Big Bang happened.

This “rhythmic” universe which dies and is reborn is kind of poetic.  It implies new creation and new chances.

But according to science, that’s not what’s in store for the universe.  Given their discovery that everything is continually expanding, scientists can now look far into the future and predict what will actually occur.

And it’s not pretty.  Over time, every part of the universe will move farther apart from every other part.  The galaxies will break up.

The stars will, one by one, grow dark as they eventually break up into smaller and smaller particles.  And then even those remnants will cease to exist as they continue their ever faster rush outward.

In a few trillion years, there will be no heat in the universe, which means the end of everything.   It will be a time of ending.  This time even has a name; it’s called the Big Freeze.

Every single thing that existed between the time of the Big Bang and the time of the Big Freeze will cease to exist – forever.

So there you go.  This explains everything.  About 14 billion years ago, the universe was born.  In the future, it will die and it will never come back, even as time marches toward infinity.  Everything else is just background noise.

All the planets and stars, all the galaxies, all the life on earth – everything we know of or can dream about, will have existed for only the tiniest instant and then will be gone.

And will never exist again.  It will truly be the end of the universe.

I find this discovery beyond depressing.  It’s shockingly gloomy, isn’t it?  There’s nothing else?  No meaning to it all?

There’s got to be something more, right?

You’ll learn about that in the Revelation series.  You’ll learn another, perhaps equally plausible, explanation for Everything.  The characters will learn that there might be a reason for their existence after all – a reason for them to strive to live.

And you’ll learn that reason along with them.

On that date, the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to three scientists: Brian P. Schmidt, Adam G. Riess, and Saul Perlmutter. They won the award by making the discovery that explains everything.

Their discovery was that the universe was still expanding.  And most disturbingly (to me, at least) that it was expanding at an increasing rate.

“So what?” you might say.  That’s a good question.

Imagine you throw a ball in the air.  The instant it leaves your hand, what happens?

It starts to slow down, of course.  Gravity exerts a force that pulls it back to earth.  Thus, it continually slows until it momentarily stops in mid air.  Then it begins its fall.

Ever since the Big Bang was first hypothesized, that’s what science thought would happen to the universe after the initial explosion.  They thought it would explode outwards until it started to slow, and then it would eventually start to contract.  This would result in the collapse of everything until a new Big Bang happened.

This “rhythmic” universe which dies and is reborn is kind of poetic.  It implies new creation and new chances.

But according to science, that’s not what’s in store for the universe.  Given their discovery that everything is continually expanding, scientists can now look far into the future and predict what will actually occur.

And it’s not pretty.  Over time, every part of the universe will move farther apart from every other part.  The galaxies will break up.

The stars will, one by one, grow dark as they eventually break up into smaller and smaller particles.  And then even those remnants will cease to exist as they continue their ever faster rush outward.

In a few trillion years, there will be no heat in the universe, which means the end of everything.   It will be a time of ending.  This time even has a name; it’s called the Big Freeze.

Every single thing that existed between the time of the Big Bang and the time of the Big Freeze will cease to exist – forever.

So there you go.  This explains everything.  About 14 billion years ago, the universe was born.  In the future, it will die and it will never come back, even as time marches toward infinity.  Everything else is just background noise.

All the planets and stars, all the galaxies, all the life on earth – everything we know of or can dream about, will have existed for only the tiniest instant and then will be gone.

And will never exist again.  It will truly be the end of the universe.

I find this discovery beyond depressing.  It’s shockingly gloomy, isn’t it?  There’s nothing else?  No meaning to it all?

There’s got to be something more, right?

You’ll learn about that in the Revelation series.  You’ll learn another, perhaps equally plausible, explanation for Everything.  The characters will learn that there might be a reason for their existence after all – a reason for them to strive to live.

And you’ll learn that reason along with them.

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